Feeding Contraption for Convenience Doesn’t Make the Cut

When I came across this new invention that made it on to Shark Tank recently, my first thought was “huh”. The “Beebo’s industry-leading technology holds your baby’s bottle for you, allowing you to use your free hand without restriction.” When describing what the Beebo does, the biggest draw for parents is that it is “hands-free”.  According to the manual found online, here are some of the perks: “Hands free feeding lets you: Read a book to your baby. Answer the phone. Use the remote.” Digging into what these perks actually mean is what got me, though.  Let’s take them one at a time. Read a book to your baby. Yes, reading to your baby is a good thing. But where are your eyes when you are reading? On the book. NOT on your baby. When you are feeding a baby, especially a newborn, it is very important to pay attention to their cues and signals. Is the flow too fast? Do they need a break? When the bottle is tilted continuously like this contraption does, the baby does not have control over the flow of the milk, so the milk can flow more quickly than your baby can swallow, increasing the risk of choking or aspiration (liquid in the lungs). If the baby falls asleep while the bottle is still in her mouth and you aren’t looking at her (because you are reading a book or looking at the TV/phone), she is at risk for aspiration as well because the milk keeps flowing into her mouth and she isn’t actively swallowing. Making the feeding the priority creates the opportunity to...

Chew on This: Considerations for Development of Oral Skills in Extreme Picky Eaters

When I evaluate a toddler that hasn’t made the transition to table food, one of the first questions I ask is “Did he mouth on toys/hands/lovies as an infant?” If the answer is yes, I always ask how much and how that child compared to other children in the home with regard to mouthing and early acceptance of oral play. However, more often than you would think, I hear from parents that these children with extreme aversion to texture in their food did not mouth at all. They blithely say “We didn’t have to baby-proof!”, unaware that their well-behaved infant’s choice to leave that paperclip on the floor is at least part of why he hasn’t moved on from pureed foods. I recently saw an older toddler who fit this description exactly—to the extreme. When observing her oral motor skills without food, there were no noticeable deficiencies. Lateral tongue movement was present, she could open and close her mouth in mock chewing, was able to blow a kiss, and kept her tongue in her mouth where it is supposed to be. No outward signs that this child had never had one bite of actual food. Not one bite swallowed. Theirs was a successful breast feeding dyad, but that was the only sustenance she got, and not from lack of trying on the parents’ part. So why couldn’t this child learn to eat? Interestingly, the family had many older siblings who had mouthed as infants, accepted spoon feedings of purees without incident, and had no trouble learning to eat the family foods. So it wasn’t what the parents had or...

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